USA NPN National Phenology Network

Taking the Pulse of Our Planet

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USA-NPN'S NATURE'S NOTEBOOK HIGHLIGHTED ON YALE CLIMATE CONNECTIONS

USA-NPN's Nature's Notebook program was recently highlighted by the Yale Center for Environmental Communication's Climate Connections podcast. Listen to the short segment, in which USA-NPN's Theresa Crimmins talks about how participants have been tracking changes in phenology.

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Date: 
09/07/2016

Midway Atoll NWR - control of invasive Verbesina

This Refuge is tracking golden crownbeard, Verbesina encelioides, to better understand its phenology. This is a high priority invasive species for this region. They want to know how long they have between emergence and ripe fruits, to better time their removal activities

Working with Nature's Notebook Data

This presentation was delivered as a final project by our NASA Space Grant Intern, Julianna Renzi. Julianna explored the data available in Nature's Notebook, looking for patterns and interesting science questions. Here she describes her methodology for college-level students, her peers. 

Date: 
Fri, 07/15/2016
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0

2016 Internships with GEORGE MELENDEZ WRIGHT INITIATIVE in various US locations

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POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: GEORGE MELENDEZ WRIGHT INITIATIVE FOR YOUNG LEADERS IN CLIMATE CHANGE

The National Park Service (NPS) is pleased to announce the George Melendez Wright Initiative for Young Leaders in Climate Change (YLCC) to provide a pathway for exemplary students in higher education (graduate students and advanced undergraduate students) to apply their skills and ideas to park-based challenges and solutions. The Initiative offers 12-week paid internships which allow students to gain valuable work experience, explore career options, and develop leadership skills through mentorship and guidance while helping to advance the NPS response to climate change. Successful students may be eligible for non-competitive hire into federal positions for which they qualify following completion of all academic requirements.

Please read the full annoncements here.

Opportunity within the NCO: 
No

Post-doc in continental-scale sample design for monarch butterflies, USGS, Wisconsin

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Post-doc in continental-scale sample design for monarch butterflies, USGS, Wisconsin

 

USGS Post-Doctoral Research – Quantitative Ecologist focused on continental-scale sample design for monarch butterflies and the resources that sustain them.

The United States Geological Survey is recruiting a post-doctoral scientist in quantitative ecology for a USGS Monarch Conservation Science Partnership project focused on developing a continental-scale sample design for monarch butterflies and the resources that sustain them. The appointment is anticipated for 2.5 years.

​S​alary ​is at the GS-11 level (ca. US$ ​59,246 per year, plus benefits; official salary level listed in official job announcement). The post-doc will work with project lead Wayne Thogmartin (USGS Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center [UMESC]), and will collaborate with other scientists in the partnership as well, including Jay Diffendorfer and Darius Semmens (both of USGS Geosciences and Environmental Change Science Center), Ralph Grundel (USGS Great Lakes Science Center), and Laura Lopez-Hoffman (University of Arizona). The position is located in La Crosse, WI, at UMESC.

The successful candidate will support the project by taking lead and collaborative roles in:

1) Developing and mapping a spatially balanced and stratified master sample for the regions of the U.S. using a Generalized Random Tessellation Stratified sampling framework. Development of this sample could involve incorporation of cluster sample considerations to minimize travel among locations. Coordination of the sample design for the monarch butterfly with the North American Bat Monitoring Program will likely be essential.

2) Conducting power analyses for attributes collected according to the proposed sample design. Such analyses might examine tradeoffs between spatial intensity versus temporal intensity (e.g., sampling alternate years at a larger number of locations versus a smaller set of continuously sampled locations); consequences of cluster arrangements; and identification of the extent to which portions of the landscape are sufficiently sampled under presumed levels of spatial and temporal variability and proposed sample sizes.

3) Summarizing data from pilot monitoring activities to inform development and implementation of the proposed sample design.

4) Evaluating the potential for existing monarch butterfly monitoring programs, such as Monarch Larvae Monitoring Program and Journey North, to satisfy sampling of portions of the landscape and identify attributes needed to draw statistically robust inferences, once those data sources are embedded within the master sample.

Applicants should possess strong skills in sample design, the R programming language, and experience publishing in peer-reviewed journals. Experience modeling wildlife populations, understanding of Bayesian statistics, and experience working on large, collaborative research projects is also desirable.  Prior experience with monarch butterflies is preferred, but not a necessary condition for this position.

For more information and for submission of application, please see https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/444134800

Opportunity within the NCO: 
No

Assistant Land Management Planner (Social Science Program Specialist/Natural Resource Specialist) GS-0101/0401-11 (Full Time - Permanent) Southwest Region – Tonto National Forest, Phoenix, Arizona

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[Snre] FW: Vacancy Announcement - Assistant Forest Planner - Tonto NF

 

 on behalf of 

Stewart, Ashley K - (akstewart) <akstewart@email.arizona.edu>
Wed 7/6/2016 3:12 PM
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Bing Maps

 

DEMO - Vacancy Announcement

16-0312-274673DP-DQ

Assistant Land Management Planner (Social Science Program Specialist/Natural Resource Specialist)

GS-0101/0401-11 (Full Time - Permanent)

Southwest Region – Tonto National Forest, Phoenix, Arizona

 

Please help us distribute this vacancy announcement for an Assistant Land Management Planner (GS-0101/0401-11) located at the Tonto National Forest Supervisor’s Office in Phoenix, AZ. The Tonto NF is revising its Land Management Plan (i.e. Forest Plan), and  as part of this effort, we are recruiting an Assistant Planner/Social Scientist/Natural Resource Specialist to be part of our core planning team.  This position is a unique opportunity to be involved in the revision effort under the new 2012 Planning Rule, helping to lead issues related to Designated Areas (including Wilderness and Wild and Scenic Rivers), Socioeconomics, Ecology, and Recreation.  This notification is being circulated to inform prospective applicants of this opportunity and direct them to USAJobs to apply (link below). The vacancy announcement opens today Wednesday, July 6ththrough Monday, July 11th.

 

The Vacancy Announcement can be accessed through the following link:https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/PrintPreview/443526700

 

For additional information, please feel free to contact Kenna Belsky, Forest Planner, at 602-225-5378.

Opportunity within the NCO: 
No

One-year postdoc in phenology and climate change at Harvard

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The Wolkovich Lab is looking for a bright, motivated and collaborative postdoctoral researcher to join the lab for one year. The lab (see www.temporalecology.org) investigates a broad range of topics (e.g., plant phenology, local adaptation versus plasticity in plant functional traits, community assembly and coexistence, climate change impacts) using a variety of methods (field, growth chamber and greenhouse studies of plant phenology, meta-analyses, statistical and process-based phenological models, coexistence modeling and climate simulations).

The position would be based at the Arnold Arboretum (in Jamaica Plain) with an appointment in the Department of Organismic & Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. Applicants must be able to spend most days at the Arboretum, while also visiting the main campus in Cambridge from time to time.

The ideal researcher will be both able to lead current projects and support ongoing work. Projects in the lab include: modeling phenology of winegrape varieties and projecting future winegrowing regions under climate change using GCMs, understanding how heat tolerance, drought tolerance and phenology are related across winegrape varieties, and understanding proximate and ultimate drivers of phenological triggers of a suite of northeastern forests and shrub species.

For more details and to apply, see http://academicpositions.harvard.edu/postings/7015

 

Opportunity within the NCO: 
No

Mapping presence and predicting phenological status of invasive buffelgrass

Abstract: The increasing spread and abundance of an invasive perennial grass, buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare), represents a critical threat to the native vegetation communities of the Sonoran desert in southern Arizona, USA, where buffelgrass eradication is a high priority for resource managers. Herbicidal treatment of buffelgrass is most effective when the vegetation is actively growing, but the remoteness of infestations and the erratic timing and length of the species’ growth periods confound effective treatment.

USGS Ecologist, GS-0408-09/11 in Flagstaff, AZ

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USGS Ecologist, GS-0408-09/11 in Flagstaff, AZ

Job Overview

Summary

About the Agency

*Are you a professional Ecologist looking for a position in the Federal workforce? *Do you have an interest in ecological restoration? *Do you want to be part of an important aspect of the Federal Government, helping with exciting and groundbreaking initiatives? If you answered "yes" to these questions, then this is the job for you! Come join the USGS and start doing the job you've always dreamed of!

Why Is It Great To Work For The USGS?
Embark on an exciting future! From the peaks of the highest mountains to the depths of the deepest seas, the U.S. Geological Survey has career opportunities that make a difference in both the lives of others and in the environment. Would you like to join the more than 10,000 scientists, technicians, and support staff of the USGS who are working in more than 400 locations throughout the United States? Apply today! As the Nation's largest water, earth, and biological science and civilian mapping agency, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collects, monitors, analyzes, and provides scientific understanding about natural resource conditions, issues, and problems. The diversity of our scientific expertise enables us to carry out large-scale, multi-disciplinary investigations and provide impartial, timely, and relevant scientific information to resource managers, planners, and other customers related to: the health of our ecosystems and environment; natural hazards that threaten us; natural resources we rely on, and; the impact of climate and land-use changes. For more information about the USGS please visit http://www.usgs.gov

What General Information Do I Need To Know About This Position?

This is a term appointment for which all qualified applicants with or without Federal status may apply and be considered. Appointment to this position, however, will not convey permanent status in the Federal service and will be for a period not to exceed 13 months with possible extensions up to a total of 4 years without further competition.

Salary GS-09: $48,968 (Step 01) to $63,654 (Step 10); Salary GS-11: $59,246 (Step 1) to $77,019 (Step 10); NOTE: First time hires to the Federal Government are typically hired at the Step 01.

Duties

As an Ecologist within the Soutwest Biological Science Center, some of your specific duties will include:

- identify and help secure funding for the Restoration Assessment and Monitoring Program (RAMPS)
- develop strategic plans for program development
- oversee the collection, management, and dissemination of data, such that the status and trends and outcomes of restoration treatments can be assessed
- prioritize development and maintenance of the RAMPS website

USGS has determined that the duties of this position are suitable for telework and the selectee may be allowed to telework with supervisor approval. The official worksite for the selectee is the duty location identified in this vacancy announcement. The selectee will typically report to this location on a regular and recurring basis.

For additional information on our internal telework policy, please reference the Department of the Interior Telework Handbook at: http://www.usgs.gov/humancapital/pb/telework.html.

Opportunity within the NCO: 
No

Citizen Science and Engagement: Using Nature's Notebook as an Engagement Strategy

This talk was delivered to a group of educators in the Miami U Master's Program at the Phoenix Zoo.

Date: 
Sat, 06/18/2016
Number of Participants: 
25
PROSE: 
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Director of Programs Position, Schoodic Institute at Acadia National Park

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Position Announcement: 

Director of Programs Position, Schoodic Institute at Acadia National Park

 

Schoodic Institute is excited to announce a great employment opportunity - a potential dream job for a scientist to live and work on the Schoodic Peninsula on the coast of Maine.  Our Director of Programs will help lead Schoodic Institute into Acadia National Park's second century.

Schoodic Institute at Acadia National Park is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to advancing ecosystem science and learning for all ages. Schoodic Institute helps the National Park Service achieve the original vision for Acadia as a destination for science and inspiration. Through innovative programs and partnerships, the nonprofit Institute is a national and community catalyst and center for research and learning.

The Institute enriches the experiences of residents and visitors to the Acadia region. Building understanding and appreciation for the complexity of the natural world leads to stronger connections to nature and the environment we share. Engaging the public in science is rapidly advancing research and offers hope as we address complex challenges in a changing environment.

Primary Responsibility: Provide strategic leadership and direction for the Schoodic Institute at Acadia National Park program team. Lead the development of new programs and partnerships, seek funding to advance the mission of Schoodic Institute, and coordinate the activities of research and education staff. The Director of Programs will work closely with the President as a key member of the management team.

 

For a complete position description, and how to apply:  http://www.schoodicinstitute.org/about/employment-opportunities/director-programs-schoodic-institute-acadia-national-park/

Opportunity within the NCO: 
No

2016 Maricopa Master Gardener Presentation

This 3 hour presentation covered phenology as it relates to climate change, and how to be involved in research, via Nature’s Notebook, to help ecologists and land managers better understand how species are responding to climate change. This is an introductory presenation to acclimate participants to the concept of phenology monitoring and how keeping records of their own can be used for personal, societal, and scientific understanding of the phenology of plants and animals.

Date: 
Wed, 05/11/2016
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Explore new phenology maps on the USA-NPN Visualization Tool

You can now explore the USA-NPN's maps of accumulated temperature and start of spring in the Phenology Visualization Tool.

Date: 
05/09/2016

Postdoctoral research position at the USGS Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

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Pre-announcement for a 3-year funded postdoctoral research position in species’ adaptive capacity and vulnerability to climate change

An exciting research opportunity is opening at the USGS Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center on the Montana State University campus for a passionate postdoctoral researcher interested in patterns of species vulnerability and resilience to contemporary climate change, as they relate to adaptive capacity. Adaptive capacity (AC) has been described as one of three main elements that influence vulnerability to climate change, in addition to exposure and sensitivity. Primary components of AC include dispersal and colonization abilities, evolutionary capacity, and phenotypic plasticity. Because AC is poorly understood, it has often been excluded from climate change vulnerability assessments, and natural resource managers are hindered in their ability to consider AC in various analyses and conservation planning activities and decisions. The successful applicant will draw from diverse literatures (e.g., genetics, ecophysiology, evolutionary biology, conservation biology), and from interactions with state and federal resource managers, other conservation practitioners, university and agency researchers, and NGO scientists to identify knowledge, management needs, and scientific gaps with regards to adaptive capacity. Well-developed interpersonal skills, a strong work ethic, and a desire to collaborate with agency scientists, resource managers, and university researchers from across the nation and world are required for success in this exceptional opportunity. The researcher will lead the organization, progress, and completion of several peer-reviewed publications, and be centrally involved in organizing two workshops and using input from numerous resource managers and researchers to develop a framework that will help natural resource managers and other conservation practitioners assess the likely AC of species within a local or regional biota in response to ongoing and projected climate change.

 

The successful candidate will be hired as a GS-11 Biologist after a nation-wide announcement on USAJOBS, and will be eligible for a benefits package. More information on benefits for USGS employees can be found at: http://www2.usgs.gov/humancapital/pb/ 

 

At their earliest convenience (ideally before 29 May 2016), highly qualified and interested individuals should contact Dr. Erik A. Beever (EBeever@usgs.gov; +1-406-994-7670) and send your CV and a ~1-page statement of interest that outlines pertinent experience, general qualifications, and your graduate degrees and topics. Do not include your social security # or phone # in these documents. Previous experience with ecological or species’ responses to contemporary climate change, disturbance ecology, and species endangerment, as well as evidence of initiative, innovation, leadership, and sustained productivity in publications are important skillsets for this opportunity. General information on the project is available at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/norock/science/adaptive-capacity-linchpin-understanding-and-addressing-species-vulnerability (on the “Science” tab), and information on the researcher in whose lab the position will be physically located is at https://www.usgs.gov/staff-profiles/dr-erik-beever . His publication list is at https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=0UJu_pcAAAAJ&hl=en .

Information about the Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center can be found at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/norock and about its research staff at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/norock/connect .

Opportunity within the NCO: 
No

USA-NPN'S NATURE'S NOTEBOOK FEATURED AS A USGS TOP STORY

The US Geological Survey is celebrating National Citizen Science Day by recognizing the opportunities for everyday citizens to participate in efforts across the country. The USGS's Top Story recognizes USA-NPN's Nature's Notebook plant and animal phenology program as a way to celebrate citizen science and get outside this spring. 

Date: 
04/15/2016

THE USA-NPN 2015 ANNUAL REPORT IS NOW AVAILABLE

Find out how we advanced science, informed decisions, and communicated and connected with the Network last year. In 2015, our observers submitted 1.7 records to the National Phenology Database, an 8% increase in records over 2014. We also saw growth in the number of active participants and Local Phenology Projects.  Read the report.

Date: 
03/31/2016

Ecological Society of America - 2016 Life Discovery Conference

Looking for ways to integrate life, earth, and space sciences with simple outdoor activities and technology? Phenology observation through the Nature’s Notebook professional and citizen science program is the answer!

Date: 
Fri, 03/18/2016
PROSE: 
0

Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Nature's Notebook Train-the-trainer Workshop

This workshop was presented to a group of education coordinators and science staff located near Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in Moss Pt., MS. Participants enjoyed 16 hours of workshop content and learned how to become Local Phenology Leaders and Trainers for volunteers in their region. The workshop consisted of, almost entirely, hands-on activities and only about 30 minutes of PowerPoint Presentations. Participants will soon be establishing a regional Phenology Trail based upon what they learned.

Date: 
Fri, 02/26/2016
Number of Participants: 
23
PROSE: 
0

Call for Proposals: Phenology 2018 Conference

The International Society of Biometeorology Phenology Commission (ISB-PC) invites proposals from ISB members to host the next International Phenology Conference (Phenology 2018), which is scheduled to be held in the time period of 9 September-18 November in 2018. This is a major international meeting, and will be the fourth in a series (started in 2010), which attracts 100-150 scientists from around the world.

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Date: 
02/26/2016

Informing intensity monitoring

Katie Jones, Ecologist at NEON, analyzed all USA-NPN intensity data (January 2012-June 2015), for concordance among observers looking at the same plant on the same day, in order to determine phenophase-specific quality control thresholds for NEON technicians' concordance in applying the same protocols. She tallied concordance for all observers together, as well as separated by skill level. Code and results available upon request.

Watch spring unfold across the US with new gridded maps from USA-NPN

Has spring arrived where you live? Our new maps using the Extended Spring Index models show spring is happening early on the Pacific Northwest coast and late in parts of the Southeast and Southwest. Watch spring unfold across the country

Date: 
02/19/2016

Citizen Science and Engagement: Using Nature's Notebook as an education engagement strategy

This talk was given as a guest lecture in blended learning course at Brandeis University taught by Colleen Hitchcock. It defines phenology, record keeping and citizen science as well as the USA-NPN and Nature's Notebook program. It also includes information on engaging students and volunteers in citizen science and Nature's Notebook and provides examples of how to establish a Nature's Notebook program in formal, informal and non-formal learning environments. 

Date: 
Thu, 02/11/2016
PROSE: 
0

An Introduction to Citizen Science

This is a short general overview of citizen science - its history and prevelance in modern peer-reviewed literature, and the value of citizen science to research.

Date: 
Tue, 02/09/2016
PROSE: 
0

Natural resource applications of the phenology data and information housed in the National Phenology Database

This presentation was given at the Joint Annual Meeting of the Widlife Society and American Fisheries Society chapters of Arizona and New Mexico. The presentation focuses on the natural resource applications of the phenology data and data products housed in the National Phenology Database

Date: 
Sat, 02/06/2016
Number of Participants: 
20
PROSE: 
0

You can now order USA-NPN and Nature's Notebook t-shirts and other products

Want to show your USA-NPN pride? You can now order products embroidered with the USA-NPN or Nature's Notebook logo, including T-shirts, Dress Shirts, Denim Shirts, Fleece Vests, Caps, Tote Bags and more. Orders may be placed through A Touch of Pride Custom Embroidery

Date: 
02/02/2016

Nature's Notebook in the Classroom and Field

This workshop was presented at the National Science Teachers Association - Regional Conference, Philadelphia. 

Date: 
Sat, 11/14/2015
PROSE: 
0

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