USA NPN National Phenology Network

Taking the Pulse of Our Planet

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Spring is arriving early in the Southeastern US

According to the USA-NPN's Spring Indices, spring is arriving 20 days earlier than a long-term average (1981-2010) in much of the Southeastern US. The Extended Spring Indices are models that predict the onset of early spring plants across the United States. You can see these maps as well as maps of Accumulated Growing Degree Days (AGDD) on the USA-NPN's Phenology Visualization Tool.

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1
Date: 
02/02/2017

The Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST)at University of Washington - Postdoctoral Research Associate in Seattle, WA

Body: 

The Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST) in the College of the Environment at the University of Washington is looking for a Postdoctoral Research Associate with expertise in educational research for a two-year, 100% FTE position starting in Winter 2017.  This position will be located on the main campus in Seattle, in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences.

COASST is a 17-year-old citizen science project primarily focused on beachcast marine birds as indicators of changes in, and forcing of, coastal ocean ecosystems in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Starting from a program of 12 participants on the south coast of Washington in 1999, COASST has grown to ~850 participants collecting data on more than 500 beaches. Current participation includes ages 7 to 93; students to park rangers to homemakers to teachers to community organizers; novice-to-master birders; tribal elders and three-generation families to recent arrivals; urbanites to residents of remote villages.  Survey sites range from Mendocino, CA to Kotzebue, AK and west through the Aleutian Islands. This grain and extent makes COASST the largest beached bird program in the world. In the last two years, COASST has also developed and implemented a small and growing marine debris data collection program.

COASST data include a rich, high quality dataset derived from participant data collection, which is used in a wide range of science and natural resource management. This dataset also includes individual participant self-assessment of expertise, accuracy (as assessed by independent verification), and effort (surveys per unit time), as well as a range of demographic information.

Together with collaborators at Oregon State University and Conservation International, COASST has received an NSF grant to examine recruitment to, and retention in, rigorous citizen science programs, using COASST as a model. We are situating our study within frameworks of Activity Theory, and Community of Practice.  As part of this effort, extensive survey data have been collected from both seasoned (more than one year of participation) and novice (just signed up for a training) participants. Additional data sources include an intensive journaling project, and focus groups. Archived data include previous surveys allowing population-level and individual tracking of participant responses over time.

Essential Qualifications: PhD in a relevant field prior to the proposed start date.  A valid Washington State driver's license and ability to travel to remote locations.

Desirable Qualifications: The ideal candidate for this position has experience with qualitative data types (open and closed ended survey answers; transcripts of focus groups and interviews, and observational field notes), has performed and refined qualitative coding using appropriate software (e.g., NVivo, Dedoose), and has expertise in a range of qualitative and quantitative (multi-variate) analysis of categorical, ranked, and numeric data (e.g., CCA, NMDS, machine learning). In addition, candidates with demonstrated experience in peer-reviewed publication in education, citizen science and/or natural science journals are highly desirable, as a central responsibility of this position is creative analysis of these large datasets in order to move citizen science, and more broadly informal science education, forward. Finally, we are looking for an independent person who can leap into analytical work, be self-directed, and who is also willing to be an interactive member of the team of faculty, postdocs, staff and students who collectively comprise COASST.  The position will require regular travel to meet with collaborators, conduct participant interviews, and observe COASST trainings, refreshers and other events.

Interested individuals can find out more about COASST by visiting our website (www.coasst.org), and/or by contacting Julia Parrish, COASST Executive Director and Professor at the University of Washington (jparrish@uw.edu)

To apply, please submit electronically to Julia Parrish the following: (1) A letter of interest detailing your skills and experience that would serve you well in this position, and how these would add substantively to the social science and educational research part of our group. Please tell us why you want this job, and why we want to interview you!  (2) A curriculum vitae which includes a publication list.  (3) A statement of scholarly work outlining your short-term and longer-term career goals.  (4) The names and contact information for three references.   Priority review of applications will begin on 25 January 2017 and proceed until a candidate is recruited. 

The University of Washington promotes diversity and inclusion among our faculty, staff and students.  COASST seeks candidates who are able to fully engage audiences from a wide spectrum of backgrounds, both on and off campus. 

University of Washington is an affirmative action and equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identify, gender expression, national origin, age, protected veteran or disabled status or genetic information.

Opportunity within the NCO: 
No

George Melendez Wright Initiative for Young Leaders in Climate Change at Devils Postpile National Monument

Body: 
Opportunity in Devils Postpile National Monument through the George Melendez Wright Initiative for Young Leaders in Climate Change to study "WHAT’S BLOOMING IN THE COLD AIR POOL?". Full description of the position can be found here. This internship is designed for undergraduate students, graduate students, and recent graduates. 
 
Information on applying can be found here. Applications due January 19th.
Opportunity within the NCO: 
No

The Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST) - Postdoctoral Research Associate in Seattle, WA

Body: 

The Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST) in the College of the Environment at the University of Washington is looking for a Postdoctoral Research Associate with expertise in educational research for a two-year, 100% FTE position starting in Winter 2017.  This position will be located on the main campus in Seattle, in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences.

COASST is a 17-year-old citizen science project primarily focused on beachcast marine birds as indicators of changes in, and forcing of, coastal ocean ecosystems in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Starting from a program of 12 participants on the south coast of Washington in 1999, COASST has grown to ~850 participants collecting data on more than 500 beaches. Current participation includes ages 7 to 93; students to park rangers to homemakers to teachers to community organizers; novice-to-master birders; tribal elders and three-generation families to recent arrivals; urbanites to residents of remote villages.  Survey sites range from Mendocino, CA to Kotzebue, AK and west through the Aleutian Islands. This grain and extent makes COASST the largest beached bird program in the world. In the last two years, COASST has also developed and implemented a small and growing marine debris data collection program.

cOASST data include a rich, high quality dataset derived from participant data collection, which is used in a wide range of science and natural resource management. This dataset also includes individual participant self-assessment of expertise, accuracy (as assessed by independent verification), and effort (surveys per unit time), as well as a range of demographic information.

Together with collaborators at Oregon State University and Conservation International, COASST has received an NSF grant to examine recruitment to, and retention in, rigorous citizen science programs, using COASST as a model. We are situating our study within frameworks of Activity Theory, and Community of Practice.  As part of this effort, extensive survey data have been collected from both seasoned (more than one year of participation) and novice (just signed up for a training) participants. Additional data sources include an intensive journaling project, and focus groups. Archived data include previous surveys allowing population-level and individual tracking of participant responses over time.

Essential Qualifications: PhD in a relevant field prior to the proposed start date.  A valid Washington State driver's license and ability to travel to remote locations.

Desirable Qualifications: The ideal candidate for this position has experience with qualitative data types (open and closed ended survey answers; transcripts of focus groups and interviews, and observational field notes), has performed and refined qualitative coding using appropriate software (e.g., NVivo, Dedoose), and has expertise in a range of qualitative and quantitative (multi-variate) analysis of categorical, ranked, and numeric data (e.g., CCA, NMDS, machine learning). In addition, candidates with demonstrated experience in peer-reviewed publication in education, citizen science and/or natural science journals are highly desirable, as a central responsibility of this position is creative analysis of these large datasets in order to move citizen science, and more broadly informal science education, forward. Finally, we are looking for an independent person who can leap into analytical work, be self-directed, and who is also willing to be an interactive member of the team of faculty, postdocs, staff and students who collectively comprise COASST.  The position will require regular travel to meet with collaborators, conduct participant interviews, and observe COASST trainings, refreshers and other events.

Interested individuals can find out more about COASST by visiting our website (www.coasst.org), and/or by contacting Julia Parrish, COASST Executive Director and Professor at the University of Washington (jparrish@uw.edu)

To apply, please submit electronically to Julia Parrish the following: (1) A letter of interest detailing your skills and experience that would serve you well in this position, and how these would add substantively to the social science and educational research part of our group. Please tell us why you want this job, and why we want to interview you!  (2) A curriculum vitae which includes a publication list.  (3) A statement of scholarly work outlining your short-term and longer-term career goals.  (4) The names and contact information for three references.   Priority review of applications will begin on 25 January 2017 and proceed until a candidate is recruited. 

The University of Washington promotes diversity and inclusion among our faculty, staff and students.  COASST seeks candidates who are able to fully engage audiences from a wide spectrum of backgrounds, both on and off campus. 

University of Washington is an affirmative action and equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identify, gender expression, national origin, age, protected veteran or disabled status or genetic information.

Opportunity within the NCO: 
No

CROWDSOURCING AND CITIZEN SCIENCE BILL PASSES IN THE SENATE

The Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science Act of 2015 was incorporated into the America Competes Act (Sec 402) and passed in the Senate on December 10, 2016. This is the first bill to explicitly grant the federal goverment authority to use crowdsourcing and citizen science methods to advance scientific research.

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Arizona Senior Academy Nature's Notebook Presentation

This introduction to Nature's Notebook was given by USA-NPN Outreach Coordinator Erin Posthumus at the Arizona Senior Academy's monthly lecture series.

The presentation involved 30 minutes of indoor presentation on early phenologists and record keeping, phenological changes in the Southwest, and how to get started with Nature's Notebook.

Date: 
Wed, 12/14/2016
Number of Participants: 
20
Partner Organizations: 
PROSE: 
0

Honorary Local Phenology Leader Certification - Application

If you've been working with volunteers and/or staff to collect phenology observations using Nature's Notebook for 6 months or longer, you can apply to be a Certified Local Phenology Leader. Specific details about the honorary certificate, required deliverables, and deadlines can be found here: www.usanpn.org/nn/LPLCertification/honorary

Local Phenology Leader Impact Statements

Use this form to share with the NCO your annual program impacts from using Nature's Notebook to achieve your goals. We welcome you to complete this form on an annual basis. 

Schoolyard Science @ Tucson Village Farm

Hands-on activities designed to help educators with ideas for doing science! This activity demonstrated how to contribute to a long-term phenology research project in your classroom. Resources shared include a Jr. Phenologist Certification Program, a species research worksheet and an example of simplified data collection sheets to be used as an introduction to phenology monitoring. 

Date: 
Fri, 12/02/2016
Partner Organizations: 
PROSE: 
0

Local Phenology Program Survey for Non-active Groups

Nature's Noteboook LogoWe want to make sure we are giving you the resources and assistance you need to get your long-term phenology program up and running with Nature's Notebook. If you have not yet begun regularly collecting and submitting data, please take a few minutes and tell us what has prevented you from getting started. 

Local Phenology Project Survey for Active Groups

Thank you for creating long-term phenology monitoring group that is actively collecting and submitting data with Nature's Notebook. 

Please take a few moments to provide us with some feedback so we can better understand the impact your group is having.  We value you, your efforts and your responses. Happy observing! 

USA-NPN Executive Director Jake Weltzin presents at National Academies of Sciences Meeting

USA-NPN Executive Director Jake Weltzin presented at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine  Meeting that took place in Irvine, CA from November 29-30, 2016. Jake showcased the USA-NPN's suite of phenology maps that were made available in Spring of 2016. 

 
Date: 
11/30/2016

The Wildlife Society 2016 Annual Conference

This presentation focused on the natural resource management applications of the data in the National Phenology Database. The presentation was given by Erin Posthumus at the Wildlife Society Annual Meeting in October 2016 in Raleigh, NC. 

Date: 
Wed, 10/19/2016
Number of Participants: 
30
PROSE: 
0

Citizen Science, the best research money can't buy - NAI National Conference

Presented at the National Association for Interpretation 2016 Conference in Corpus Christi, Texas

Want to integrate outdoor education and technology, where visitors are a part of a useful and meaningful data project? Learn how we promote citizen science projects in the field through short and long-term examples designed for hands-on science! Presenters: LoriAnne Barnett, USA-NPN Education Coordinator; Kimberly Baker, Park Ranger, Caesar Creek Lake, Ohio (US Army Corps of Engineers); and Samantha Bachelder, Park Ranger, Caesar Creek Lake, Ohio (US Army Corps of Engineers). 

Date: 
Wed, 11/09/2016
PROSE: 
0

McDowell-Sonoran Conservancy Volunteer Training

The Phenology Training on Saturday October 29th at 1:00PM at Scottsdale Community College, presented by LoriAnne Barnett, the Education Coordinator from USA National Phenology Network.  Students from Scottsdale Community College and folks from Desert Botanical Garden will also be attending this training, since they are also creating Phenology Trails on Campus and at DBG. 

Here is a little background on the project in the Preserve:  

Purpose

Date: 
Sat, 10/29/2016
PROSE: 
0

Phoenix Phenology Trail Advanced Training

Phenology refers to key seasonal changes in plants and animals from year to year—such as flowering, emergence of insects and migration of birds—especially their timing and relationship with weather and climate. 

Phenology - 2 Day Advanced Training (12 Hrs)

Day 1 included an overview of phenology and Nature's Notebook, as well as practice making observations, using the phenophase protocols and intensity measures, and visualization tool and partner dashboard. 

Date: 
Fri, 10/07/2016
PROSE: 
0

Central Arizona Phenology Trail Advanced Training

This Advanced Training was an introduction to the plants and animals that appear each season here in Prescott. Learn how to document what you see and contribute it to the Nature's Notebook Citizen Science Program, where your contributed information will be used to help answer local and national questions about species response to climate change. If you have been keeping a nature journal for years, bring it along to share. 

Date: 
Fri, 09/23/2016
PROSE: 
0

NEW STUDY SHOWS SPRING IS HAPPENING EARLIER IN THREE OF EVERY FOUR NATIONAL PARKS

The USA-NPN is part of a new study published in Ecosphere that shows spring is advancing in 75% of 276 National Parks studied. This shift is "extreme" in half of the Parks.

Type: 
0
Date: 
10/06/2016

Global Alliance of Phenological Observation Networks (GAPON) Submission

Network Information Form

If you would like to be included on our list of large-scale phenology networks around the globe, please fill out this form with information about your organization.

Starred items are required and all others can be included if they are applicable for your organization. 

USA-NPN'S NATURE'S NOTEBOOK HIGHLIGHTED ON YALE CLIMATE CONNECTIONS

USA-NPN's Nature's Notebook program was recently highlighted by the Yale Center for Environmental Communication's Climate Connections podcast. Listen to the short segment, in which USA-NPN's Theresa Crimmins talks about how participants have been tracking changes in phenology.

Type: 
0
Date: 
09/07/2016

Midway Atoll NWR - control of invasive Verbesina

This Refuge is tracking golden crownbeard, Verbesina encelioides, to better understand its phenology. This is a high priority invasive species for this region. They want to know how long they have between emergence and ripe fruits, to better time their removal activities

Working with Nature's Notebook Data

This presentation was delivered as a final project by our NASA Space Grant Intern, Julianna Renzi. Julianna explored the data available in Nature's Notebook, looking for patterns and interesting science questions. Here she describes her methodology for college-level students, her peers. 

Date: 
Fri, 07/15/2016
PROSE: 
0

2016 Internships with GEORGE MELENDEZ WRIGHT INITIATIVE in various US locations

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POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: GEORGE MELENDEZ WRIGHT INITIATIVE FOR YOUNG LEADERS IN CLIMATE CHANGE

The National Park Service (NPS) is pleased to announce the George Melendez Wright Initiative for Young Leaders in Climate Change (YLCC) to provide a pathway for exemplary students in higher education (graduate students and advanced undergraduate students) to apply their skills and ideas to park-based challenges and solutions. The Initiative offers 12-week paid internships which allow students to gain valuable work experience, explore career options, and develop leadership skills through mentorship and guidance while helping to advance the NPS response to climate change. Successful students may be eligible for non-competitive hire into federal positions for which they qualify following completion of all academic requirements.

Please read the full annoncements here.

Opportunity within the NCO: 
No

Post-doc in continental-scale sample design for monarch butterflies, USGS, Wisconsin

Body: 

Post-doc in continental-scale sample design for monarch butterflies, USGS, Wisconsin

 

USGS Post-Doctoral Research – Quantitative Ecologist focused on continental-scale sample design for monarch butterflies and the resources that sustain them.

The United States Geological Survey is recruiting a post-doctoral scientist in quantitative ecology for a USGS Monarch Conservation Science Partnership project focused on developing a continental-scale sample design for monarch butterflies and the resources that sustain them. The appointment is anticipated for 2.5 years.

​S​alary ​is at the GS-11 level (ca. US$ ​59,246 per year, plus benefits; official salary level listed in official job announcement). The post-doc will work with project lead Wayne Thogmartin (USGS Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center [UMESC]), and will collaborate with other scientists in the partnership as well, including Jay Diffendorfer and Darius Semmens (both of USGS Geosciences and Environmental Change Science Center), Ralph Grundel (USGS Great Lakes Science Center), and Laura Lopez-Hoffman (University of Arizona). The position is located in La Crosse, WI, at UMESC.

The successful candidate will support the project by taking lead and collaborative roles in:

1) Developing and mapping a spatially balanced and stratified master sample for the regions of the U.S. using a Generalized Random Tessellation Stratified sampling framework. Development of this sample could involve incorporation of cluster sample considerations to minimize travel among locations. Coordination of the sample design for the monarch butterfly with the North American Bat Monitoring Program will likely be essential.

2) Conducting power analyses for attributes collected according to the proposed sample design. Such analyses might examine tradeoffs between spatial intensity versus temporal intensity (e.g., sampling alternate years at a larger number of locations versus a smaller set of continuously sampled locations); consequences of cluster arrangements; and identification of the extent to which portions of the landscape are sufficiently sampled under presumed levels of spatial and temporal variability and proposed sample sizes.

3) Summarizing data from pilot monitoring activities to inform development and implementation of the proposed sample design.

4) Evaluating the potential for existing monarch butterfly monitoring programs, such as Monarch Larvae Monitoring Program and Journey North, to satisfy sampling of portions of the landscape and identify attributes needed to draw statistically robust inferences, once those data sources are embedded within the master sample.

Applicants should possess strong skills in sample design, the R programming language, and experience publishing in peer-reviewed journals. Experience modeling wildlife populations, understanding of Bayesian statistics, and experience working on large, collaborative research projects is also desirable.  Prior experience with monarch butterflies is preferred, but not a necessary condition for this position.

For more information and for submission of application, please see https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/444134800

Opportunity within the NCO: 
No

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