USA NPN National Phenology Network

Taking the Pulse of Our Planet

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The USA-NPN, phenology, and our partners are often in the news. Follow some recent stories below.

Image credit:
Sara N. Schaffer

News

  • "Why You Shouldn't Hope for an Early Spring" featuring NPN
    Saturday, March 8, 2014

    Ensia is an online and print magazine showcasing solutions to the Earth's biggest environmental challenges. Their readers include environmental leaders and decision makers around the world as well as researchers and scientists and the public.  They have posted a story "Why You Shouldn't Hope for an Early Spring" quoting the National Phenology Network director, Jake Weltzin, and NPN data.

  • USA-NPN joins DataONE as a member node
    Monday, February 3, 2014

    USA-NPN becomes a DataONE Member Node, delivering phenology data from the Nature’s Notebook program collected at 2,000 sites across the United States from 2009 through 2012. The DataONE infrastructure will improve access to the data resources generated by USA-NPN, and contribute to a community effort to improve the standards and infrastructure supporting data access. 

  • Jake Weltzin's Webinar for the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center
    Tuesday, January 28, 2014

    USA-NPN Executive Director Jake Weltzin gave this webinar for the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center, entitled "The USA National Phenology Network: Informing Science, Conservaton and Resource Management." 

  • A Local Hero for Phenology
    Thursday, January 2, 2014

    Cheyanna Washburn, a youth educator with the California Phenology Project, won a youth engagement award and is featured as a local hero in Bay Nature.

  • Phenologist Wins 2013 AGU Sulzman Award
    Wednesday, December 4, 2013

    The Biogeosciences Section of AGU will present the first Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring to Dr. Heidi Steltzer, of Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO. Dr. Steltzer is a phenology champion in both the education and research realms.  By incorporating juniper phenology observing into her undergraduate class she made a big contribution to the Juniper Pollen Project's efforts to predict pollen dispersal. She also utilizes the resources available through Nature's Notebook to develop inquiry-based labs on species students select for their projects, for example, oaks, rabbitbrush, aspen and more.  In her research she has developed the Mantis, a near-surface instrument array for monitoring phenology through surface greenness and microclimate. Our appreciation and congratulations to Heidi for all of her efforts in the field of phenology. 

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