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Active Local Phenology Networks

Here you will find our list of Local Phenology Programs using Nature's Notebook. If a group listed has a blank entry or is missing information, they have not updated their information with our USA-NPN NCO staff in 2019.

Click here to view a map of all of our Certified Local Phenology Leaders.

If you are a Local Phenology Leader who would like to complete or update your LPPs listing, please contact groups@usanpn.org.

Shore Gardens with the National Tropical Botanical Garden would like to establish a group within Nature's Notebook to establish a citizen scientist monitoring program for native Hawaiian plants as well as tropical ornamental plants in order to track changes over time.

Kalaheo, HI
First Observation:
10/2017

To engage the NYBG community and connect them to science, while collecting valuable data on our living collections.

Bronx, NY

The New York Phenology Project is a networked community science initiative focused on climate and urbanization impacts on plants and pollinators.

The data is connected to both a national and regional database through the USA-NPN and is used by scientists, land managers and individuals to inform decision-making and build long-term data sets capable of answering pressing ecological questions.

First Observation:
06/2011

As a seasonal ranger, one of the topics we interpret is climate change, this is relevant because we have F1 hybrid aspens here that are relicts from the last ice age. Nature's Notebook is one way we collect data to see how climate change is affecting trees in the area. As a middle school science teacher, I want to instill in my students a love for the precious resource they have right here, and get them to see that they can contribute in meaningful ways to science and policy.

Valentine
NE
This LPP is working with under-served communities.
First Observation:
11/2021

We are using Nature's Notebook to engage group members, who are also Master Naturalists or enrolled in our certification program, in citizen science, to heighten their awareness and encourage activism around climate change, and to enhance their knowledge of and interest in the natural world.

First Observation:
04/2021

We are using Nature's Notebook to engage group members, who are also Master Naturalists or enrolled in our certification program, in citizen science, to heighten their awareness and encourage activism around climate change, and to enhance their knowledge of and interest in the natural world.

First Observation:
04/2021

North Salem High School wants to contribute data to Oregon Season Trackers. They would like to be able to compare data over the years at their school campus.

Salem, Oregon
This LPP is working with students.
First Observation:
03/2018

New York State Hemlock Initiative with Cornell University is using Nature's Notebook to provide a sense of community and stewardship in relation to protecting our hemlock resources. This program is designed to be implemented by anyone that is interested in conserving hemlocks by helping researchers and mangers better understand hemlock woolly adelgid.

NY
First Observation:
09/2012

We are using Nature's Notebook to notice small changes and see them as part of a much bigger picture including weather conditions, environmental factors, and human influence.

Avilla
IN
This LPP is working with students.
Partner Website:
First Observation:
10/2021

We are using Nature's Notebook to get students outside, contribute to science, and take a bigger-picture view of the world.

Oak Hill
WV
This LPP is working with students.
This LPP is working with under-served communities.
First Observation:
09/2021

Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death (ROD) is a disease caused by invasive fungal pathogens. Since the disease was first discovered in 2010, ROD has killed about one million ʻōhiʻa lehua trees that are foundational to the landscape and Hawaiian culture . A current USGS Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center (PIERC) research project is tracking planted ʻōhiʻa sapling mortality, however, Hawaiʻi has a diverse range of climates, soil types, and vegetation. We plan to partner with various state and federal programs on Hawaiʻi Island that give away or sell ʻōhiʻa seedlings to the public, including the DLNR (Department of Land and Natural Resources), NPS (National Park Service), and USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service).

‘Ōhi‘a Restoration Projectplans to engage community using Nature’s Notebook to improve tracking rates on planted saplings, increase overall planting of ʻōhiʻa in various private and public climates, and collect data on growth phenology. We will hold community meetings at local nurseries to garner input and train volunteers to track growth rates, and phenology of their trees in different geospatial locations helping community to connect and participate in research and learn about the risks to forest and watershed health, cultural landscapes, and native species persistence.

Hilo
HI
This LPP is working with under-served communities.
First Observation:
03/2021

Ohio WILD School Sites Phenology Network is using Nature's Notebook to link all of the WILD School Sites in Ohio (165+ if they all participate) into one group to monitor the impacts that small scale habitats have on local wildlife and plant populations.  They also aim for the schools to be able to compare date between sites.

This LPP is working with under-served communities.
First Observation:
02/2019

Oregon Season Tracker is a Regional Phenology Network. Headed up by Jody Einerson, our project of Oregon State University aims to link natural resource managers, educators, researchers and others in the community to the science they use through collaborative citizen science. Oregon Season Tracker is working with researchers from OSU and HJ Andrews Experimental Foresty LTER to expand climate data and open channels of communication with the public across all of Oregon.

Statewide
OR
This LPP is working with students.
This LPP is working with under-served communities.
Partner Website:
First Observation:
03/2014
Impact Statement:

2019 Impact Statement

Issue: Oregon Season Tracker (OST) aims to broaden discussion and understanding about climate science, linking natural resource managers, educators, researchers and others in the community to the science they use through collaborative citizen science. Volunteers contribute scientific data on precipitation and plant phenology at their home, woodland, farm, ranch or school for their own land management decisions and to share with research partners both locally and nationally.

Action: In 2019 we continued to concentrate on 1.) Reaching out to partners within Extension from previously untapped counties to train volunteers. 2.) Concentrating on supporting/retaining our volunteers through continued education opportunities and communications.  3.) Continuing work with classrooms, offering teacher professional development, OST curriculum materials, and classroom support through 4-H.

Outcome: By the end of 2019 the OST citizen scientists accounted for 189 unique registered rain gauge stations tracking precipitation with the OST program and the Community Collaborative Rain Hail & Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) national database. OST partners with the National Phenology Network (NPN) to track plant phenology observations through Nature’s Notebook.

Volunteers associated with OST partner group are submitting data from their own home sites. In 2019 we also were able to reach out to Southwest Oregon with a training in collaboration with an Extension partner - training 14 new observers from that area.  In 2019 we also worked with HJ Andrews to secure a $5000. grant to support the program in schools.  This allowed us to bring the first group of 50 students to the forest to tour, meet the researcher, and go out in the field and share data collection.

2019 For the first time we took 50 - 5th grade students to the Andrews forest to interact with the climate researchers.  We conducted a first continuing education phenology refresher class.  We conducted a training in Southwest Oregon to expand our reach.  We trained 46 new citizen scientist who accounted for 33 new observation sites.

In 2019 the program received the 2018 PhenoChampion award from USA-NPN, we received OSUEA Search for Excellence award, and had the cover article in the Rural Connections; the magazine of the Western Rural Development Center Spring/Summer 2019 issue.

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2018 Impact Statement

Issue: Oregon Season Tracker (OST) aims to broaden discussion and understanding about climate science, linking natural resource managers, educators, researchers and others in the community to the science they use through collaborative citizen science. Volunteers contribute scientific data on precipitation and plant phenology at their home, woodland, farm, ranch or school for their own land management decisions and to share with research partners both locally and nationally.

Action: In 2018 we strategically concentrated 1.) Reaching out to partners within Extension from previously untapped counties to train volunteers. 2.) Concentrating on supporting/retaining our volunteers through continued education opportunities and communications. This included our first volunteer/researcher learning retreat at partner HJ Andrews Experimental Forest LTER 3.) Continuing work with classrooms, offering teacher professional development, OST curriculum materials, and classroom support through 4-H.

Outcome: By the end of 2018 the OST citizen scientists accounted for 156 unique registered rain gauge stations tracking precipitation with the OST program and the Community Collaborative Rain Hail & Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) national database. OST partners with the National Phenology Network (NPN) to track plant phenology observations through Nature’s Notebook. Volunteers associated with OST partner group at Nature’s Notebook have contributed over 21, 000 phenology observation in 2018. OST Retreat evaluations showed a strong connection between researcher interactions and volunteers gaining better understanding climate science.

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