You are here

Active Local Phenology Networks

Here you will find our list of Local Phenology Programs using Nature's Notebook. If a group listed has a blank entry or is missing information, they have not updated their information with our USA-NPN NCO staff in 2019.

Click here to view a map of all of our Certified Local Phenology Leaders.

If you are a Local Phenology Leader who would like to complete or update your LPPs listing, please contact groups@usanpn.org.

The project at Minnewaska is focused on outreach and engagement. There are two trails currently run by environmental education interns at the park, who hope to engage adults and children in the phenology program through public hikes and school programs. The phenology trail is a part of the New York Phenology Network. Public hikes are conducted monthly at each trail to make phenology observations and to recruit dedicated volunteers as well. An end goal of this project is to establish enough interest through public hikes and signs at the park that park patrons will be engaged in the phenology trail on their own time. One of the trails is the Beacon Hill Footpath, which is located near Lake Minnewaska at the Wildmere parking area of Minnewaska State Park Preserve. Species along the trail include mountain laurel, sheep laurel, red maple, black huckleberry, Eastern hemlock, hemlock woolly adelgid, sweet birch, and American witch hazel. The second trail is the Lake Maratanza Loop Road, located at the Sam’s Point area of Minnewaska. This trail includes the species red maple, mountain laurel, sheep laurel, pitch pine, American witch hazel, highbush blueberry, and common milkweed.

NY
First Observation:
03/2017

MN Zoo - SES Citizen Science team and Nature's Notebook are working together to collect data on a few key species in the habitats around the school.  Using Nature's Notebook to introduce Citizen Science to campers in the MN Zoo program and School of Environmental Studies students.  Also hope to raise awareness for how climate change is affecting the plants and animals in the area. 7-9th grade campers in the MN Zoo programs and School of Environmental Studies students (11th and 12th grade) and some staff will be collecting observations. The plan is to have SES students make observations during the school year (Spring and Fall) and Zoo campers during the summer (June - August).

First Observation:
04/2017

Mohonk Preserve is using Nature's Notebook in New Paltz, NY as a part of the New York Phenology Project. We aim to provide phenology projects as a citizen science program for our community and to compare data within our regional network.

New Paltz
NY
First Observation:
03/2014

Students are using phenology monitoring to better understand the species that are a part of their schoolyard habitat as a part of the school's environmental club at Montessori of the Rio Grande Charter School.

NM
This LPP is working with students.
First Observation:
03/2017

Napa Solano Audubon is using Nature's Notebook with the Audubon CA chapter (48 throughout the state) volunteers to monitor bird phenology on preserves statewide to detect any possible climate change drive shifts and to engage volunteers in climate change research. This chapter is active in San Pablo Bay, CA and is observing the following: Song Sparrow – year round, Bufflehead - Winter, Western Bluebird – Year round, Tree Swallow – Summer, nests in weather head near bench, Red-tailed Hawk – Year Round.

American Canyon
CA
First Observation:
05/2016

Shore Gardens with the National Tropical Botanical Garden would like to establish a group within Nature's Notebook to establish a citizen scientist monitoring program for native Hawaiian plants as well as tropical ornamental plants in order to track changes over time.

Kalaheo, HI
First Observation:
10/2017

To engage the NYBG community and connect them to science, while collecting valuable data on our living collections.

Bronx, NY
First Observation:
06/2011

North Salem High School wants to contribute data to Oregon Season Trackers. They would like to be able to compare data over the years at their school campus.

Salem, Oregon
This LPP is working with students.
First Observation:
03/2018

Ohio WILD School Sites Phenology Network is using Nature's Notebook to link all of the WILD School Sites in Ohio (165+ if they all participate) into one group to monitor the impacts that small scale habitats have on local wildlife and plant populations.  They also aim for the schools to be able to compare date between sites.

This LPP is working with under-served communities.
First Observation:
02/2019

Oregon Season Tracker is a Regional Phenology Network. Headed up by Jody Einerson, our project of Oregon State University aims to link natural resource managers, educators, researchers and others in the community to the science they use through collaborative citizen science. Oregon Season Tracker is working with researchers from OSU and HJ Andrews Experimental Foresty LTER to expand climate data and open channels of communication with the public across all of Oregon.

Statewide
OR
This LPP is working with students.
This LPP is working with under-served communities.
Partner Website:
First Observation:
03/2014
Impact Statement:

2019 Impact Statement

Issue: Oregon Season Tracker (OST) aims to broaden discussion and understanding about climate science, linking natural resource managers, educators, researchers and others in the community to the science they use through collaborative citizen science. Volunteers contribute scientific data on precipitation and plant phenology at their home, woodland, farm, ranch or school for their own land management decisions and to share with research partners both locally and nationally.

Action: In 2019 we continued to concentrate on 1.) Reaching out to partners within Extension from previously untapped counties to train volunteers. 2.) Concentrating on supporting/retaining our volunteers through continued education opportunities and communications.  3.) Continuing work with classrooms, offering teacher professional development, OST curriculum materials, and classroom support through 4-H.

Outcome: By the end of 2019 the OST citizen scientists accounted for 189 unique registered rain gauge stations tracking precipitation with the OST program and the Community Collaborative Rain Hail & Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) national database. OST partners with the National Phenology Network (NPN) to track plant phenology observations through Nature’s Notebook.

Volunteers associated with OST partner group are submitting data from their own home sites. In 2019 we also were able to reach out to Southwest Oregon with a training in collaboration with an Extension partner - training 14 new observers from that area.  In 2019 we also worked with HJ Andrews to secure a $5000. grant to support the program in schools.  This allowed us to bring the first group of 50 students to the forest to tour, meet the researcher, and go out in the field and share data collection.

2019 For the first time we took 50 - 5th grade students to the Andrews forest to interact with the climate researchers.  We conducted a first continuing education phenology refresher class.  We conducted a training in Southwest Oregon to expand our reach.  We trained 46 new citizen scientist who accounted for 33 new observation sites.

In 2019 the program received the 2018 PhenoChampion award from USA-NPN, we received OSUEA Search for Excellence award, and had the cover article in the Rural Connections; the magazine of the Western Rural Development Center Spring/Summer 2019 issue.

,

2018 Impact Statement

Issue: Oregon Season Tracker (OST) aims to broaden discussion and understanding about climate science, linking natural resource managers, educators, researchers and others in the community to the science they use through collaborative citizen science. Volunteers contribute scientific data on precipitation and plant phenology at their home, woodland, farm, ranch or school for their own land management decisions and to share with research partners both locally and nationally.

Action: In 2018 we strategically concentrated 1.) Reaching out to partners within Extension from previously untapped counties to train volunteers. 2.) Concentrating on supporting/retaining our volunteers through continued education opportunities and communications. This included our first volunteer/researcher learning retreat at partner HJ Andrews Experimental Forest LTER 3.) Continuing work with classrooms, offering teacher professional development, OST curriculum materials, and classroom support through 4-H.

Outcome: By the end of 2018 the OST citizen scientists accounted for 156 unique registered rain gauge stations tracking precipitation with the OST program and the Community Collaborative Rain Hail & Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) national database. OST partners with the National Phenology Network (NPN) to track plant phenology observations through Nature’s Notebook. Volunteers associated with OST partner group at Nature’s Notebook have contributed over 21, 000 phenology observation in 2018. OST Retreat evaluations showed a strong connection between researcher interactions and volunteers gaining better understanding climate science.

Orme School in Mayer, AZ is using Nature's Notebook to connect my students with nature, improve their observation skills, and to empower them to become citizen scientists.

Mayer, AZ
This LPP is working with students.
This LPP is working with under-served communities.
Partner Website:
First Observation:
03/2019

Pascagoula River Audubon Center is using Nature's Notebook as baseline phenology monitoring of local species as a part of the Gulf Coast Phenology Trail.

Moss Point
MS
First Observation:
11/2017

Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel, Maryland is using Nature's Notebook.

Laurel
MD
Partner Website:
First Observation:
03/2018

Pages