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Active Local Phenology Networks

Here you will find our list of Local Phenology Programs using Nature's Notebook. If a group listed has a blank entry or is missing information, they have not updated their information with our USA-NPN NCO staff in 2019.

Click here to view a map of all of our Certified Local Phenology Leaders.

If you are a Local Phenology Leader who would like to complete or update your LPPs listing, please contact groups@usanpn.org.

FL
First Observation:
06/2011
Tallahassee
FL
This LPP is working with students.
First Observation:
04/2013

Flowers for Bats is a Nature's Notebook group participating with the Tucson Phenology Trail.

AZ
Partner Website:
First Observation:
05/2018
Los Altos Hills
CA
This LPP is working with students.
First Observation:
06/2014
Willcox
AZ
First Observation:
10/2014

UMass Amherst's Foxcroft Farm is an ecology undergraduate class and is using Nature's Notebook to provide a citizen science approach to engaging in ecological research.

Amherst
MA
This LPP is working with students.
First Observation:
04/2017

Frenchman Bay Conservancy in Hancock, Maine, is using Nature's Notebook to expand the geographic range of their phenology and bird migration project, which may turn into other projects as their data and program develop further. They also seek to inform local partners about the importance of phenology data on their land and how they can help and contribute to their own conservation goals. Also they aim to engage volunteers and participants on how they can become involved and easily contribute to science by using Nature's Notebook.

Hancock, Maine
Partner Website:
First Observation:
07/2018
Greenville
SC
This LPP is working with students.
First Observation:
02/2014

Georgetown University in Washington D.C. is hosting Georgetown Phenology Project using Nature's Notebook in a college course building on a previous professor's several year phenology project, and using the old data and species, continue to monitor the same trees. This will allow the students to continue the record and use past data to make predictions during each year.

This LPP is working with students.
First Observation:
03/2018

Glacier National Park would like to formalize observations and input them into a larger database, using Nature's Notebook. With the USA-NPN's tools, they will create visualizations to be used for educational purposes. They aim to expand this program beyond the division of Interpretation to include other divisions within the park.

Saint Mary, West Glacier
MT
Partner Website:
First Observation:
10/2018
Marin
CA
First Observation:
07/2011
Moss Point
MS
First Observation:
02/2017
Grand Canyon
First Observation:
06/2013

Grassroots Ecology has established a Nature's Notebook group in order to track the observations from California Naturalist class community scientists and other volunteers of the organization who are interested in contributing to phenology projects.

Santa Clara and San Mateo County
CA
Partner Website:
First Observation:
03/2019

Great Pond Mountain Conservation Trust is a part of Downeast Phenology Trail in Maine, is using Nature's Notebook to expand the geographic range of our phenology and bird migration project, which may turn into other projects as data and program develop further. We seek to inform local partners about the  importance of phenology data on their land and how they can help and contribute to their own conservation goals. Great Pond Mountain Conservation Trust aims to engage volunteers and participants on how they can become involved and easily contribute to science by using Nature's Notebook.

Bucksport
ME
Partner Website:
First Observation:
07/2018

We intend to use Nature's Notebook as a gathering place for the phenological data collected so that everyone can follow the same protocols and have an organized place to store it. Additionally, Nature's Notebook helps us with providing a multitude of resources to help both new staff members and volunteers at our National Park to access the information that they need to make the project successful. Lastly, we want the data we're collecting to be accessable and useful to many other organizations and researchers and Nature's Notebook makes that easy to do.

Cherokee
NC
This LPP is working with under-served communities.
First Observation:
03/2012

Greensboro College is using Nature's Notebook in undergraduate ecology and environmental science courses to show our students how their observations are valuable beyond our classroom and to help teach the concepts of macro-scale ecology, citizen science, and collaborative research.

Greensboro
NC
This LPP is working with students.
This LPP is working with under-served communities.
First Observation:
03/2021
Various
AL, LA, MS
Partner Website:
First Observation:
01/2017
Impact Statement:

2018 Impact Statement

The Gulf Coast Phenology Trail was established in 2017 to have citizen scientists observe and record phenophases in red maple, red bay, yaupon holly, and wax myrtle plants using the program, Nature's Notebook. Initially the four core plants were selected to learn if there is a east-west gradient in plants based on the seasons. The inventory of plants and animals were increased depending on the site.
Sites selected for the Gulf Coast Phenology Trail included primarily federal lands along the Mississippi Gulf Coast and areas in southeastern Louisiana. Using an established monitoring program such as Nature's Notebook made it easy to implement with the assistance of staff and recruited citizen scientists. Networking with Master Naturalists, Master Gardners, or Habitat Stewards helped with the recruitment and training for volunteers who needed to provide pay-back hours. The pool of potential volunteers was enlarged to include students, interns, and the interested public. Networking, one-on-one recruitment, advertisements, social media were used to increase participation.
Adding additional partners such as a community college and universities affiliated sites increased the "inventory" of core plants and the number of staff, students, and volunteer participants. Providing training classes for the interested public increased their knowledge of phenology and climate change. Students spent time out of the classroom to observe and work together in teams. Volunteers who regularly monitored "their" plants have learned about the life cycles and made connections that increased their knowledge of native plants. Anecdotally, participants stated that they look at plants with a new set of eyes and they look forward to changes or phenophases. Managers of sites wanted to know how they can share information about the program and have requested talks or written information.

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