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Active Local Phenology Networks

Here you will find our list of Local Phenology Programs using Nature's Notebook. If a group listed has a blank entry or is missing information, they have not updated their information with our USA-NPN NCO staff in 2019.

Click here to view a map of all of our Certified Local Phenology Leaders.

If you are a Local Phenology Leader who would like to complete or update your LPPs listing, please contact groups@usanpn.org.

Albuquerque
NM
First Observation:
03/2014

Adkins Arboretum in Ridgely, Maryland wants to connect to an accessible database and develop phenology-related educational materials in relation to climate change and engage citizens in science as it relates to climate change. We aim to have researchers and staff analyze six years of observational data to answer science or management questions by 2024.

Ridgely
MD
Partner Website:
First Observation:
02/2018

Two phenology efforts are ongoing at the Arnold, including the Native and Indicator Observation Program and the Tree Spotters program.

Boston
MA
Partner Website:
First Observation:
08/2009
Impact Statement:

2017 Impact Statement

Lizzie Wolkovich, Assistant Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, launched the Arnold Arboretum Tree Spotters program pilot in 2015. Her research explores how climate and community assembly may explain and forecast plant phenology, which is strongly linked to climate and can be easily observed. Lizzie is interested in engaging citizen scientists to collect phenology data to support her research.

From 3/25/15 – 3/26/17: Trained 238 volunteers to make/record observations in Nature’s Notebook (68,651 observations to date); offered 33 training classes (28 for new Tree Spotters and 5 refresher classes for returning volunteers), 22 opportunities for volunteers to meet with researchers on the grounds, and 6 educational sessions (also open to the public); held 3 social events. Staff: research assistants/graduate students/interns and a volunteer.

Forty-three volunteers have participated actively in the program (making multiple observations and/or collaborating on special projects). We have also engaged the general public via our educational sessions. We have an active social media presence (Facebook, Flickr, Twitter), a monthly eNewsletter, a website, and a volunteer database. As a result of the success of this pilot, the Arboretum is now looking for funding to ensure that the program will continue.

We are using Nature's Notebook to document a record of local phenological change for 10 plants and increase public awareness of phenology.

Vail
CO
Partner Website:

Recently, we've introduced phenology in our teacher education programs with the phenomenon of changes in the timing of sap flow in sugar maples, approaching the explanation from the perspectives of western sugar bush farmers (Cornell University specialists and scientists) and Indigenous sugar bush farmers, Anishinaabe elders. This phenomenon is more local, this is a tree native to our forests in New York City. Teachers create a model based on an initial explanation for the sap flow changes from Cornell scientists and their own knowledge. We introduce the voice and Traditional Ecolological Knowledge of Indigenous sugar bush keepers, and teachers revise models based on the understandings of all streams of knowledge.

Brooklyn
NY
This LPP is working with under-served communities.
First Observation:
04/2009

Crosby Arboretum is using Nature's Notebook for outreach and engagement of young visitors.

Picayune
MS
First Observation:
01/2018

Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden's primary purpose in creating a phenology 'walk' is outreach and engagement of our school groups, volunteers and Garden guests. Through community engagement, visitors will select visitation of spaces underutilized while making connections in nature. School groups will learn about phenology, make 'big picture' connections and potentially begin the journey of becoming citizen scientists.
Their science question is broad-based yet relevant enough to the general Garden audience.
"How do changes in season affect native plant species over time?"
Twenty-five select tree, fern and wildflower plots have been identified for observation in the Garden in Belmont, NC, on the existing Persimmon Trail, easily accessible to all participants making observations. 

Belmont
NC
First Observation:
12/2016
Phoenix
AZ
First Observation:
09/2013

Idaho Botanical Garden in Boise is a regional leader in sustainable horticulture practices and education, and use Nature's Notebook  generated data to articulate shifts in local phenology and their implications toward landscape suitability and resilience.

Boise, Idaho
First Observation:
03/2019

Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Education in Richmond, VA is using Nature's Notebook to help the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden community understand that it can contribute to climate change research by participating in phenology citizen science activities.

Richmond, VA
First Observation:
01/2019

Mars Hill University Arboretum and Tree Trail has a Arboretum and Tree Trail which is a fairly new resource on our Mars Hill, NC campus.  We want to get students more involved in the community, and the community more involved on campus, both centered around a citizen science project on campus. Additionally, our science department (Biology and Zoology) has a goal of giving students more practice with quantitative skills. Collecting, managing, and analyzing phenology data will provide some of that practice. These needs will be addressed by having students enter and use the data within the Nature's Notebook database.

Mars Hill
NC
This LPP is working with students.
First Observation:
10/2019

Shore Gardens with the National Tropical Botanical Garden would like to establish a group within Nature's Notebook to establish a citizen scientist monitoring program for native Hawaiian plants as well as tropical ornamental plants in order to track changes over time.

Kalaheo, HI
First Observation:
10/2017

To engage the NYBG community and connect them to science, while collecting valuable data on our living collections.

Bronx, NY

The North Carolina Arboretum engages school groups and visitors in making phenology observations using Nature's Notebook, through its Project EXPLORE program.

Asheville
NC
This LPP is working with students.
Impact Statement:

2017 Impact Statement

Teachers have expressed a need for on-site field trips, eliminating travel time and costs, that address curriculum standards and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education. As an organization we would like to reach audiences not typically served by field trips by engaging with Title One schools and offer place-based educational programs. We offered a Project EXPLORE mini grant to teachers in western North Carolina through The NC Arboretum in Asheville, NC. We modeled for teachers and students how to collect data for Nature's Notebook in phenology plots we set up in their schoolyards and met with both students and teachers three times throughout the school year to focus on Nature's Notebook. The teachers and students collected data weekly from September to April and presented their findings at our mountain science expo. Since beginning the Project EXPLROE program in 2013, we have had 35 teachers in 28 schools and 2000 students throughout western North Carolina participate in Nature’s Notebook. Students have submitted 33,863 observations. Based on pre and post surveys we have successfully provided a way for teachers to be able to meet their curriculum while taking students outside and connected students with local nature, while they’ve contributed to the scientific community through Nature’s Notebook, and ultimately gained interests in science and science careers.

Red Butte Garden Phenology Project in Salt Lake City, Utah is using Nature's Notebook to offer a citizen science component to K-6th Grade field trips, with plans to expand the program further. We are also looking to use the data for so many educational opportunities. 

Salt Lake City
UT
This LPP is working with students.

Undergraduate class at UC Santa Barbara and volunteers are making observations at the Garden. Part of the California Phenology Project.

Santa Barbara
CA
Partner Website:
Impact Statement:

2017 Impact Statement

It is important to promote education of the public concerning seasonal plant cycles, as well as plants’ sensitivities to climate, in order to demonstrate the critical importance of humans’ interconnection to our environment. Changes in plant phenomena affect abundance, diversity of species, interactions, ecological functions, effects on water, energy, and chemical elements. Recorded data can be used in research and management, informing decisions, as climate change affects earth’s ecosystems. The California Phenology Project was started in 2010 by Dr. Susan Mazer, by a grant from National Science Foundation, and in collaboration with National Park Service Climate Change Response Program, US Geological Survey, and USA-National Phenology Network. Utilizing National Phenology Network’s Nature’s Notebook, nineteen plant species and almost 1,300 individual plants on public and private lands have been monitored. Over sixty trainings with seven hundred participants, have been given, with more trainings occurring. As of March 15, 2017, 1,440,000 (1.44 million) phenological observations have been recorded. The group leader was trained as Citizen Scientist-Phenologist by Dr. Susan Mazer at Santa Barbara Botanic Garden two years ago. We currently study five plants, and have plans to add more. Four people have been trained to utilize Nature’s Notebook, and found it fulfilling to be able to share the process of plant phenophases with students. The significance of data collection and recording from plants, while enjoying the beauty of the plants themselves, makes phenology an extremely rewarding and worthwhile project.

Smithsonian Gardens has established a Nature's Notebook group monitoring plants within the Smithsonian Museum grounds through contributions by staff and volunteers. Smithsonian Gardens strives to engage, inspire, and inform the public through horticultural displays and educational programming. SG would like this data to contribute to our long-term collection management, visitor outreach, and scientific research.

Partner Website:
First Observation:
04/2019

The Mission of the garden is to inspire an appreciation & understanding of the beauty & value of Asian & California native plants, and to promote their conservation in natural habitats & gardens. The garden had a name change from Quarryhill to Sonoma Botanical Garden. We have expanded the scope of the project to Quercus douglasii in the natural habitat of the property outside of the 25 acre Asian garden with four specific tree genus being observed. Malus sieboldii, Cornus kousa, Diospyros lotus & Magnolia stellata.Sonoma Botanical Garden has been observing four tree species for since 2015 using Nature's Notebook. The species are Cornus kousa, Magnolia stellata, Malus sieboldii and Diospyros lotus.

Glen Ellen
CA
Partner Website:
First Observation:
02/2015

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